a black and white illustration of a woman standing in front of a window in a dark room at night

Shifting My Depression Treatment from Ketamine to TMS

Unfortunately, ketamine is not helping me much anymore. The infusion before last gave me a small boost, and I remember feeling good for about five days following my appointment. Some of the other benefits I get from ketamine, including improved appetite, fewer thoughts about self-harm and suicide, and more energy, still seemed to extend for a week or so post-infusion. On the whole, though, I wasn’t feeling encouraged.

My most recent ketamine infusion came just a few days before I started transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatments. I have almost no memory of that infusion. The day after the infusion did seem better, and I had the sense that things around me seemed a bit brighter or more colorful. I hate to say it, but aside from that mild improvement on that particular day, I don’t think the infusion did much of anything for me.

So, I’ve decided to stop getting ketamine infusions for the foreseeable future. It’s unclear why they stopped helping me, so I’m not opposed to keeping the option of restarting them in my back pocket. Right now, though, I don’t think that continuing them is providing much, if any, benefit to me.

Lithium and My Poor Kidneys

I’m disappointed that I’ve come to this conclusion about ketamine, but I’m also in a slightly delicate spot, and something needs to change.

Image by chenspec on Pixabay

I increased my lithium dose in March because my mental health was deteriorating. Lithium is probably the medication that I have the most conflicted relationship with. Taking such a high dose is effective at reducing my suicidal thoughts, but it’s not ideal for my poor kidneys. And when my kidneys can’t keep up, my lithium levels begin to inch toward toxic.

My lithium level as of a few weeks ago was slightly above the upper limit of “therapeutic.” It’s back in range now because I’ve been working on doing that human thing where you drink water, but I’d still rather not take this dose of lithium for very long.

Deciding to Try TMS

It’s the combination of ketamine’s waning efficacy and lithium’s waxing toxicity that led me to TMS. I’m not in a good place, and I need a different solution. TMS is mostly covered by my insurance, there’s a clinic I like close to where I live, and the downsides of trying it are very few.

Initially, I considered continuing ketamine while doing TMS, as one could receive both treatments concurrently. I’ve opted to do TMS alone because ketamine is not offering me relief and no longer seems worth the expense. However, it’s possible that ketamine is helping me more than I realize, and stopping infusions might worsen my depression. I’ll just have to see how it goes.

I also considered ECT because of how severe my depression was before I increased my lithium dose, but I think it makes sense to try TMS first.

I’ve done a few TMS treatments so far, and they were strange and interesting experiences, but I think I’ll save my descriptions for another post.

Setting Ketamine Infusions Aside

It makes me rather sad to think that this part of my life is over. I’ll miss the wonderful people at my ketamine clinic, and I’ll miss writing about my experiences there. I’m glad I documented my ketamine dreams, which I will remember with equal measures bemusement and fascination.

I’m also upset that I’ve “failed” yet another treatment. It’s a discouraging development that leads me down well-worn paths of self-criticism and frustration.

That said, I’m incredibly grateful for the improvements I gained from ketamine. There was a while there where it was really turning my life around. I started volunteering, I was happier, I felt excited about life, and then the pandemic hit, and a series of stressors undid all the positive progress I’d made. (My therapist would remind me that not all of my progress was lost. That’s just my brain lying to me again.)

Although I won’t be getting infusions, I would love to keep up with the research and continue sharing information about ketamine. I would especially like to see what data exists on the long-term efficacy of ketamine and whether my experience of it is represented in the literature. A quick search shows tons of studies published in 2021 and 2022, so there’s certainly new information out there. My brain power is lacking, though, so I’ll have to save that for another time as well.

Photo by Brad Christian on Unsplash (@y_barron)

I still believe that it’s important to raise awareness of ketamine treatment for depression and reduce the stigma associated with it. It may not be working for me right now, but it’s still a valuable option that people with treatment-resistant depression should be aware of.

So, I’ll leave the door open for further posts in The Ketamine Chronicles. I still want the series to be a resource for people who are considering IV ketamine infusions and find first-person accounts helpful or reassuring. I hope I’ve accomplished that to some degree in this phase of the series. If you’ve been reading for a while or just started, thank you for clicking and scrolling and reading about my bizarre, profound, and nonsensical ketamine dreams.

3 thoughts on “Shifting My Depression Treatment from Ketamine to TMS

  1. That’s really shitty about both the ketamine and the lithium. I haven’t tried TMS because I’d have to pay out of pocket, and it wouldn’t work as well as ECT so why not just get ECT that I wouldn’t have to pay for. I’ve been pondering having my mom come stay with me to ferry me back and forth from outpatient ECT, but the idea of having her stay with me is really unappealing. Then again, I was pondering methods yesterday, which is generally a sign it’s time to do something differently. I’m also contemplating laying out thousands of dollars for ketamine. Not sure yet what I’ll do.

    Depression sucks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ugh, I had a whole reply typed out, and Stella made me lose it because she started flipping out at a bunny outside.
      The gist of it was that ECT definitely sounds like it makes more sense for you than TMS, and that it sucks when there’s no ideal way to change things. I certainly relate to noticing thoughts like that, and I always find it hard to get myself to do something positive about it. One thing I admire about you is how responsive you seem to be when your symptoms worsen. I think you set a good example by advocating for yourself to get what would benefit you. All that’s to say that I hope you do try something different, and it hope it helps. Depression does suck.

      Liked by 1 person

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